Truth or truthiness? | Paul Kirschner

Deze blog schreef ik oorspronkelijk voor het septembernummer van het blad Didactief  onder de titel “Waar of waarheidsachtig” waar ik tweemaandelijks iets schrijf over m.i. spraakmakend wetenschappelijk onderzoek en wat de betekenis daarvan is in/voor het onderwijs. Deze is iets uitgebreider dan wat in Didactief verscheen. Is een onderzoek betrouwbaar of lijkt het alleen zo? […]

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/1KnOWGO

Advertisements

Speaking at the eLearning Guild’s DevLearn | Will Thalheimer

I’m delighted to be attending the eLearningGuild’s DevLearn conference in Las Vegas coming up in late September and early October.

 

 

The eLearning Guild always puts on a great conference and I’m excited to learn the latest and greatest on elearning and mobile learning. This year, I’m going to be keeping my eyes out for examples of micro learning and subscription learning — as I see more an more interest in smaller learning nuggets.

Also, I’ll be speaking on “Measuring eLearning to Create Cycles of Improvement.” In my session, I’ll share research-based findings and their implications…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/1KXMCRi

Colleges go ‘test-optional’ to fool rankings | Joanne

When colleges go “test-optional” — applicants need not submit SAT or ACT scores — they claim it’s a way to increase diversity. That’s not the reason, writes Stephen Burd on the Hechinger Report. It’s a way to boost college rankings.

“Test-optional policies overall have not been the catalysts of diversity that many have claimed them to be,” concludes a 2014 University of Georgia study.

When applicants don’t need to submit SAT or ACT scores, more students apply, especially those with poor scores, writes Burd. “For the colleges, more applicants mean more students they can reject, which…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/1EvVgtD

No math, no money | Joanne

Payscale’s new College Salary Report ranks colleges and universities, as well as majors for all degree levels, by alumni salaries.

Once again, petroleum engineering tops the list of bachelor’s degrees with the highest earnings. According to Payscale’s survey, petroleum engineering graduates start at $95,401 and reach $150,000 in mid-career.

It’s followed by Nuclear Engineering, Actuarial Mathematics , Chemical Engineering and Electronics & Communications Engineering.

Math teachers can tell students that all but one of the top 40 majors on the list require strong math skills. However,…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/1EvLg3J

Two unsung heroes of higher-level thinking | Katharine Beals

Every year when teaching my “autism and reasoning” class, I have another chance to delve into cognitive science. And each time, I’m reminded of how much is involved even in apparently “meaningless” tasks like memorizing and reproducing complex shapes like (excuse the low fidelity) this one:

Unless you have a photographic memory, incorporating this figure–or at least as much as possible of it–into long term memory involves a rather high-level skill: coming up with some sort of organizational structure. Perhaps it’s a house with a weather vane on top lying on its side with its base to the…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/1FcqlNP

Why ghoti gives me the tiotce | Reid Smith

I am usually a reasonably measured person but I have just about reached my limit. Four times in a little over a week I have encountered somebody using ghoti as an argument against using an aspect of systematic phonics instruction. For those unfamiliar with the term often misattributed to George Bernard Shaw, the expression ghoti (pronounced like ‘fish’) is supposed to be a clever wordplay using a number of the grapheme-phoneme correspondences found in the English language. In this case ‘gh’ as /f/ from enough, ‘o’ as /i/ from women and ‘ti’ as /sh/ from notion.

I even read in a recent…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/1KWZeIi

Why ghoti gives me the tiotce | Reid Smith

I am usually a reasonably measured person but I have just about reached my limit. Four times in a little over a week I have encountered somebody using ghoti as an argument against using an aspect of systematic phonics instruction. For those unfamiliar with the term often misattributed to George Bernard Shaw, the expression ghoti (pronounced like ‘fish’) is supposed to be a clever wordplay using a number of the grapheme-phoneme correspondences found in the English language. In this case ‘gh’ as /f/ from enough, ‘o’ as /i/ from women and ‘ti’ as /sh/ from notion.

I even read in a recent…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/1NIATMG