Where Do the Ideas of “Success” and “Failure” in Schooling Come From? (Part 4) | larrycuban

In the first three parts of this series, I answered the question of where “success” and “failure” as ideas came from. I identified and described three core values–individualism, equal opportunity, and community–that are inherent to the American character as far back as colonial times. Part 3 and this final section describe how those values are spread through distinctive American institution such as advertising and sports. This part deal with schools as a public vehicle for communicating and inculcating these values.

Schooling

Establishing public schools to instill highly prized values in…

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“A Generally Accepted Record of Efficacy”: States’ Religious Exemptions for Caregivers Who Neglect or Harm Children | Jean Mercer

Some readers will be aware that in many states of the U.S., parents who refuse to immunize their children against contagious diseases may suffer no penalty if they can argue that their decisions were made on the basis of religious beliefs or philosophical principles. One of the reasons that the parents can do this is that state laws are affected by the requirements of the Federal law CAPTA (Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, which from 1996 onward demanded this policy on First Amendment grounds, and because of lobbying by groups like Christian Scientists).

It’s likely that fewer…

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Beware the college debt trap | Joanne

Young people are encouraged to see college as an investment that will pay off in the future, but borrowing to pay for college can be a bad choice, writes math teacher Darren on Right on the Left Coast.

He recalls his own ignorance and arrogance in applying for college without considering how he’d pay for it. (Nobody in his family had ever earned a degree.) He assumed he’d get into the Air Force Academy, but didn’t. Unable to pay for UCLA or Purdue, he was planning to enlist and eventually use the GI Bill to fund college. Then he was accepted at tuition-free West Point.

For all the…

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Student loan defaulters may lose licenses | Joanne

Defaulting on student loans can be a career ender, reports the New York Times. Nineteen states suspend state-issued professional licenses if residents fall behind on loan payments,” write Jessica Silver-Greenberg, Stacy Cowley and Natalie Kitroeff. “Another state, South Dakota, suspends driver’s licenses, making it nearly impossible for people to get to work.”

Debra Curry, a nurse in Georgia, pays $1,500 monthly on student loans to keep her license. Photo: Audra Melton/ New York Times

“Firefighters, nurses, teachers, lawyers, massage therapists, barbers, psychologists and real estate…

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Where Do the Ideas of “Success” and “Failure” in Schooling Come From? (Part 4) | larrycuban

In the first three parts of this series, I answered the question of where “success” and “failure” as ideas came from. I identified and described three core values–individualism, equal opportunity, and community–that are inherent to the American character as far back as colonial times. Part 3 and this final section describe how those values are spread through distinctive American institution such as advertising and sports. This part deal with schools as a public vehicle for communicating and inculcating these values.

Schooling

Establishing public schools to instill highly prized values in…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2AfKnOM

The Pyramid of Myth | theeffortfuleducator

There are many myths in education.  I believe they all result from well-intentioned educators and/or researchers.  However, with these myths, evidence simply does not exist to back up their claims.  A few of the most prominent myths are: learning styles, left brain/right brain theory, and brain gyms.  I have also previously written on the popular statement of edumyth, “Students don’t learn from people they don’t like.”  These myths may appear harmless, but I don’t see it that way.  For example, if students believe they learn via any one of the popular VAK learning styles, that will lead to…

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What’s the Difference Between Engineering at a Tech Company Versus a School? (Sam Strasser) | Pedro

This is so great:

“I think by far my biggest advice is this: If you don’t have classroom experience and are building a product, it’s tempting to think you know exactly what you’re doing because we all went to school, and we think that we know what school is.

But, we don’t know what school is. And we definitely don’t know what teaching is, especially as engineers. So my advice is to over-correct for this and build empathy for actual teachers in actual classrooms—not the theoretical idea you have about what teaching should or could be or was for you. Because that almost certainly is not…

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