#rEDOnt – A Diamond in the . . . Ice?!? | Of Possible Worlds

Despite nature’s little surprise in the form of an ice storm, researchED Ontario was a success by every measure. This installment was the fifth I’ve attended, in three different countries. I can’t say enough about the inspirational and collegial atmosphere of this movement, and I’m so happy to see it growing into a successful and valuable staple in the world of teacher/educator professional development.

I hope the two-day conference trend continues, although there’s still never enough time to chat with people and to delve into everyone’s expertise in a variety of areas. My researchED…

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Failure is educational for teachers too | Joanne

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Being “the worst” in his weight-lifting class made Ryan Sprott a better teacher, he writes on Ed Week Teacher.

“Remembering what failure feels like can be difficult for teachers,” he writes. Adults usually get to avoid doing things they’re not good at. Students don’t have that choice.

When I began workout classes as an adult, I was transported back to that dusty weight room of my youth, once again feeling like a failure in comparison to those around me. I was partnered with a guy close to my size, and, just like in junior high, he still lifted twice as much as me.

But there was one…

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What Teachers Know | pocketquintilian

A piece appeared on the AARE blog today which drew attention to an important distinction to be recognised in current education debates. Although Dr. Mockler makes her point well, I feel that she draws unwarranted conclusions from it.

The distinction between “teacher quality” and “teaching quality” is indeed not a trivial one, and her finding that the former expression is used far more often in reference to school teachers than to academics does not surprise me at all. There is an obvious and important reason for the discrepancy: at the post-secondary level, most teachers have a PhD or…

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Stap voor Stap van Concreet naar Abstract (Concreteness Fading) | Paul Kirschner

In het aprilnummer van Didactief bespreek ik een aanpak om kinderen te helpen leren abstract te denken. Hier een iets meer uitgebreide versie van mijn column daar. Leerlingen kunnen pas principes toepassen als ze abstract kunnen denken. Een geschikte aanpak daarvoor is concreteness fading: geleidelijk pas je de ondersteuning aan. Faden, het doen verdwijnen of […]

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Assessing My Writing: A Look Backward | larrycuban

A month ago, a colleague wrote to me and asked me to write about my career as a practitioner/scholar over the past half-century. I accepted. Part of the request was to include what I have written about policy and practice as a historian of education that contributed to both research and practice.

Sure, there are metrics that suggest what a “contribution” may be. There are Google scholar and Edu-Scholar rankings. There are Web of Science citations. All well and good but influence or impact on practitioners and researchers? Maybe yes, a bit here and there. And maybe no, not a trace. Rankings…

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#rEDOnt – A Diamond in the . . . Ice?!? | Of Possible Worlds

Despite nature’s little surprise in the form of an ice storm, researchED Ontario was a success by every measure. This installment was the fifth I’ve attended, in three different countries. I can’t say enough about the inspirational and collegial atmosphere of this movement, and I’m so happy to see it growing into a successful and valuable staple in the world of teacher/educator professional development.

I hope the two-day conference trend continues, although there’s still never enough time to chat with people and to delve into everyone’s expertise in a variety of areas. My researchED…

Continue reading at:

https://ift.tt/2JhTKP0