Visit to Michaela | ellenmetcalf

Last Friday I paid a visit to Michaela Community School, the controversial London school that is pioneering a traditional, yet innovative, approach to teaching and learning. I had heard a lot about the school, mainly through the many excellent blogs written by the teaching staff, and had read their book with interest. How would it look in real life?

I arrived at 11.30 and was buzzed in at both the gate and the door. The reception are is a calm, adults-only space where friendly staff welcomed me and gave me a Visitor badge and a set of rules. There were two other teachers on my tour, both…

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From self-esteem to social-emotional learning | Joanne

Years ago, I speed-read a self-esteem book about a hedgehog (or some such) who was afraid to go to school on the first day because he didn’t know how to read. By the final page, he’d learned it was OK: His teacher would “love” him “just the way you are.”

Parents love their little hedgehogs. Teachers do not. It’s not their job. Their job is to teach reading, among other things. If “just the way you are” is illiterate, then a good teacher will do her best to change that.

I agree with Checker Finn that the self-esteem movement of the ’80s was an “educational disaster.” Teachers were told…

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Teachers as Practical Politicians | larrycuban

Besides managing a classroom of 20 to 30 or more students while teaching lessons every day, teachers also do politicking. Teachers using ClassDojo, a free software application (see previous two posts), is just another instance of teacher thinking and acting politically. More about teachers using ClassDojo as a political act later in the post.

I do need to explain that in 2017 for teachers to survive and thrive in their classrooms, they have to be practicing politicians.

Historical context for teachers acting politically

For decades, educators have winced at using the word “politics”…

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‘Civil rights’ roll back? Or common sense? | Joanne

The Trump administration is rolling back civil rights efforts, according to ProPublica.

A leaked memo reveals that the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) plans to change the Obama-era policy on investigating complaints.

Charges of sexual assault and harassment will be the most affected by OCR’s new policy, writes R. Shep Melnick, a Boston College professor and author of the forthcoming book, The Transformation of Title IX.  What’s being rolled back, he writes, is an aggressive strategy to force compliance with “legally questionable” OCR dictates.

Under the Obama…

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Visit to Michaela | ellenmetcalf

Last Friday I paid a visit to Michaela Community School, the controversial London school that is pioneering a traditional, yet innovative, approach to teaching and learning. I had heard a lot about the school, mainly through the many excellent blogs written by the teaching staff, and had read their book with interest. How would it look in real life?

I arrived at 11.30 and was buzzed in at both the gate and the door. The reception are is a calm, adults-only space where friendly staff welcomed me and gave me a Visitor badge and a set of rules. There were two other teachers on my tour, both…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2sESWwN

Teachers as Practical Politicians | larrycuban

Besides managing a classroom of 20 to 30 or more students while teaching lessons every day, teachers also do politicking. Teachers using ClassDojo, a free software application (see previous two posts), is just another instance of teacher thinking and acting politically. More about teachers using ClassDojo as a political act later in the post.

I do need to explain that in 2017 for teachers to survive and thrive in their classrooms, they have to be practicing politicians.

Historical context for teachers acting politically

For decades, educators have winced at using the word “politics”…

Continue reading at:

http://ift.tt/2rYBxgy

The Teacher Testimony Project: Mobilizing And Lifting The Voices Of Teachers Of Color | bbond

Our guest author today is Conra D. Gist, an assistant professor of curriculum and instruction at the University of Arkansas, and 2016-2017 Spencer/National Academy of Education Post-Doctoral Fellow. The following blog describes the genesis of the Teacher Testimony Project, an American Educational Research Association (AERA) Education Service Project designed to work with aspiring and current Teachers of Color.

Given the wealth of research indicating the value Teachers of Color* add to the teaching profession (Villegas and Irvine 2010), it is always surprising to encounter critiques that…

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